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CFL vs. LED vs. BULBS

LED - MORE INITIAL COST BUT IN FUTURE MORE SAVINGS

USE ELECTRIC/HYDROGEN/SOLAR ENERGY AFFILIATED CARS....

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ITS TIME TO CLOSE EVERY SINGLE APPLIANCE WORKING WITHOUT ANY USE...

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Posted by harsh_tch Wednesday, August 26, 2009
Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable


Illustration showing a brick sidewalk lit by a solar-powered outdoor walk light.

Solar-Powered Outdoor Lighting
Installing solar lighting around your home andgarden is quick and easy with an added bonus—no wires or electricity costs!



Image of a while laptop with the Energy Star label.

Keep Your Home Office Efficient with ENERGY STAR
Home offices are increasingly popular. Be sure to use ENERGY STAR office equipment to save electricity.



Illustration showing the invoice and purchase price tag for an appliance.

Illustration showing the operating price tag for an appliance and many utility bills.

What's the Real Cost?
Every appliance has two price tags—the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new appliance.


Image of a compact fluorescent bulb over a recycling symbol.

CFLs contain a very small amount of mercury sealed within the glass tubing. Many retailers are offering free recycling services for consumers at their stores.


Illustration of a gas water heater with an EnergyGuide label.

Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water
Look for the ENERGY STAR label.



Cutaway illustration of house showing insulation in walls, foundation, crawlspace, floors, and attic.

Where to Insulate
Adding insulation in the areas shown above may be the best way to improve your home's energy efficiency. Insulate either the attic floor or under the roof. Check with a contractor about crawl space or basement insulation.





Living Zero Home Tour: Save Energy, Money and the Planet

Your Home's Energy Use


Energy Auditing Tips

  • Check the insulation levels in your attic, exterior and basement walls, ceilings, floors, and crawl spaces. Visit www.energysavers.gov for instructions on checking your insulation levels.

  • Check for holes or cracks around your walls, ceilings, windows, doors, light and plumbing fixtures, switches, and electrical outlets that can leak air into or out of your home.

  • Check for open fireplace dampers.

  • Make sure your appliances and heating and cooling systems are properly maintained. Check your owner's manuals for the recommended maintenance.

  • Study your family's lighting needs and use patterns, paying special attention to high-use areas such as the living room, kitchen, and outside lighting. Look for ways to use lighting controls—like occupancy sensors, dimmers, or timers—to reduce lighting energy use, and replace standard (incandescent) light bulbs and fixtures with compact or standard fluorescent lamps.


Graphic of a pie chart: space heating 31%, space cooling 12%, water heating 12%, lighting 11%, computers and electronics 9%, appliances 9%, refrigeration 8%, other 8%.


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